Was it really a modest proposal

I think it is agreed by all sound-minded parties that these plutocrats bear responsibility for the present deplorable state of our republic and are themselves a very great grievance. Therefore, whoever could find out a fair, cheap, and easy method of making these top one-percenters useful members of society would deserve so well of the public as to have his or her statue set up for a preserver of the nation in the place where there once stood an oxidized equestrian monstrosity dedicated to the resoundingly defeated Robert E. As to my own part, having turned my post-election thoughts upon this important subject, and maturely weighed the several schemes of other projectors, I have found them grossly lacking.

Was it really a modest proposal

Quick Answer

Of course, he is not actually promoting that people start to eat children; he uses this extreme example as a way to depict how inhumanely the Irish were being treated, as if they were not human, amidst the English "devouring" Ireland.

Expert Answers favoritethings Certified Educator Probably, as far as many of his contemporaries were concerned, this proposal did go too far, especially if they did not understand the text's ironic and embittered tone.

Swift's point is that the situation between the wealthy English and impoverished Irish has alreadygone too far. He suggests that, if the English are content to treat their Irish brothers and sisters with such a lack of humanity, if they are willing to figuratively "devour" Ireland's Probably, as far as many of his contemporaries were concerned, this proposal did go too far, especially if they did not understand the text's ironic and embittered tone.

Introduction Of course, he is not actually promoting that people start to eat children; he uses this extreme example as a way to depict how inhumanely the Irish were being treated, as if they were not human, amidst the English "devouring" Ireland. In the end, the narrator even references other possibilities that could be used to alleviate the suffering of the Irish, saying.

Swift's point is that the situation between the wealthy English and impoverished Irish has already gone too far. He suggests that, if the English are content to treat their Irish brothers and sisters with such a lack of humanity, if they are willing to figuratively "devour" Ireland's land, resources, and government—which has resulted in terrible poverty among the Irish—then it does not require much of a leap to suggest that the English literally devour the Irish too.

In the end, the narrator even references other possibilities that could be used to alleviate the suffering of the Irish, saying.

Of taxing our absentees at five shillings a pound: Of using [no products] except what is of our own growth and manufacture: Of utterly rejecting the materials and instruments that promote foreign luxury: Of curing the expensiveness of pride, vanity, idleness, and gaming in our women: Of introducing a vein of parsimony, prudence and temperance: Of learning to love our country.

Of quitting our animosities and factions.

From the SparkNotes Blog

Of being a little cautious not to sell our country and consciences for nothing: Of teaching landlords to have at least one degree of mercy towards their tenants. Lastly, of putting a spirit of honesty, industry, and skill into our shop-keepers, who, if a resolution could now be taken to buy only our native goods, would immediately unite to cheat and exact upon us in the price, the measure, and the goodness, nor could ever yet be brought to make one fair proposal of just dealing, though often and earnestly invited to it.

However, he says, that he doesn't want to hear about any of these possibilities until "there will ever be some hearty and sincere attempt to put them into practice. As the English have chosen not to adopt any of these, Swift does not go too far by ironically suggesting a less-palatable pun intended!A Modest Proposal and Other Satires Questions and Answers.

SparkNotes: A Modest Proposal: Summary

The Question and Answer section for A Modest Proposal and Other Satires is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel. The issue of whether or not Swift goes too far in "A Modest Proposal," is an issue of taste.

Was it really a modest proposal

It's a satire, of course, so the speaker has much freedom in what he writes. A Modest Proposal For preventing the Children of Poor People From being a Burthen to Their Parents or Country, and For making them Beneficial to the Publick, commonly referred to as A Modest Proposal, is a Juvenalian satirical essay written and published anonymously by Jonathan Swift in Genre: Satirical essay.

A Modest Proposal was written by Jonathan Swift (), who is well-known as the author of the satirical political fantasy, Gulliver's Travels. Swift published the Modest Proposal in as a pamphlet (a kind of essay in an unbound booklet).

Was it really a modest proposal

Further Study. Test your knowledge of A Modest Proposal with our quizzes and study questions, or go further with essays on the context and background and links to the best resources around the web.

A Modest Proposal Jonathan Swift. This entry presents criticism of Swift's satire A Modest Proposal for Preventing the Children of the Poor People from Being a Burthen to Their Parents, or.

A Modest Proposal - Wikipedia